Computer Science and Management (IG department), fall semester only
Biological and Food Engineering (GBA department)
Materials Science (MAT department), spring semester only
Mechanical Engineering and Interactive design (MI department), fall semester only
Water Science (STE department)

 

Computer Science and Management (IG department)

 

Courses (fall semester)

Teacher(s)

Hours 

ECTS

F1. Software Engineering and Design Principles (fourth year) T. Stratulat 60 5
F2. Data warehouse and reporting (fourth year) A.Laurent 24 1,5
F3. Machine Learning and Data Mining (fourth year) A.Laurent 24 1,5
F4. Web APp Engineering 2 (WAPE 2) (fifth year)
 C. Tibermacine
30
2
F5. Project of Web APp Engineering 2 (P-WAPE 2) (fifth year) C. Tibermacine 12 2
F6. Recommendation system (fourth year)
E. Pacitti
5
 0,5
F7. Software Engineering Practices (fourth year)
T. Stratulat
 24 1,5
F8. Distributed Databases and NoSQL (fourth year) E. Pacitti 36 2,5
F9. Industrial project (fourth year) A. L. Villaret 35h/week during 8 weeks 5
F10. Large Scale Information Management (fifth year) E. Pacitti 21 1

Courses (spring semester)

Teacher(s)

Hours 

ECTS

S1. Object oriented design and programming (lecture+practical) (third year)
C. Tibermacine
25
2
S2. Marketing and innovation (fourth year)
L. Buisson,
C. Seguin
15
1,5
Web and Mobile app design and development (fourth year) C. Fiorio, V. Berry 45 4,5
S3. Industrial project (fourth year)
A. L. Villaret
35h/w during 8 weeks
5

F1 . Object-Oriented Software Engineering (fourth year)

The goal of this module is to provide students with theoretical background and practical tools for developing software projects using a systematic approach such as the V-model, modular and object-oriented design, and object-oriented technologies Frameworks and design patterns are also studied, and examples are illustrated through UML and Java. A mini project to develop a client server application using a framework is also required for students.
Prerequisites: an introductory course on an object-oriented programming language is preferable but not mandatory.
Evaluation: The final grade is obtained on the basis of a written examination.

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F2. Data Warehouse and Reporting (fourth year)

(booklets/slides in english, spoken language in class to be confirmed) This course introduces the core concept of data warehouses by presenting the main differences between operational (OLTP) and decisional (OLAP) databases. The multidimensional model and key performance indicators are presented together with the concept of ETL. Professional tools are used during hands-on tutorials.
Prerequites: This course requires prior knowledge in SQL.
Evaluation: The examination consists of a written test and a report of hands-on sessions.

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F3. Data Mining and Machine Learning (fourth year)

(booklets/slides in english, spoken language in class to be confirmed) This course presents the main methods of data mining from the computer science perspective: supervised and unsupervised algorithms such as decision trees, naive Bayes, k-nearest neighbours, k-means,… and pattern mining (frequent item-sets, association rules, sequential patterns). The course also focuses on evaluation methods (confusion matrix, quality measures).
Prerequites: No prior knowledge required for this course.
Evaluation: The examination consists of a written test.

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F4. Web APp Engineering 2 (WAPE 2) (fifth year)
(supports et cours en anglais)
The goal of this module is to provide students with an introduction to advanced languages and frameworks for Web and reactive application development in the Java ecosystem, like JEE microservices, JPA, Spring MVC and Spring WebFlux. We also introduce the specifities of frameworks in other ecosystems like ASP.NET and Scala Play. In addition, in this module we address Cloud deployment of such kind of applications.
Prerequisites: introductory course on Web App Development
Evaluation: quiz and lab work

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F5. Project of Web APp Engineering 2 (P-WAPE 2) (fifth year)

The goal of this project is to develop and deploy a real-world Web reactive application with Spring framework.
Prerequisites: Web APp Engineering 2 (WAPE 2)
Evaluation: project deliverables and final oral presentation & demo

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F6. Recommendation Systems (fourth year)

This cours introduces the fundamental concepts of recommendations systems and the most important models : collaborative filtering, content-based filtering, social based filtering. The top-N recommendation algorithm is presented and experienced with a pratical exercice.
Prerequites: familiarity with matrix computation, and java language
Evaluation: A report

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F7. Software Engineering Practices (fourth year)

The goal of this module is to provide students the opportunity to practice and use the appropriate tools to develop software projects using a systematic approach such as the V-model, modular and object-oriented design, and object-oriented technologies.
The subject is either provided by an industrial partner or proposed by the students. 4 or 5 students compose project teams and they take on responsibilities in turn. At each phase, a student should consider working at least 3 use cases, different from those of the previous phase, ultimately covering all use-cases and project phases equally.
Prerequisites: Participation in the Object-Oriented Software Engineering course (F1) or previous project experience using object-oriented design or programming language.
Evaluation: The project is evaluated according to the quality of deliverables that students provide at each phase (reports, UML diagrams, use case reports, tests, code, user interface design, database design, etc.), and the management activities they involve in (roles, meeting facilitation, initiative, creativity, etc.).

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F8. Distributed Databases and NoSQL (fourth year)

The goal of this module is to provide the theoretical background of distributed databases (DDB): query processing, transaction management, data replication, parallelism (MapReduce), etc. Next we study different NoSql storage solutions, data models and applications. We also present and compare JSON and XML and its applications. Class work is proposed to deepen the concepts of DDB, and practical works in Lab are proposed to understand two main approaches: MongoDB, and frameworks Spark Map/Reduce.
Prerequisites: experience with relationnal databases and java
Evaluation: 1 evaluation with a partener and 1 individual evaluation

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F9. Industrial Project (fifth year)

Team project, practicals, design and development of information systems to meet the real demands of industrial partner companies or clients. Students learn to conduct an IT project in a professional context and face real difficulties.
Context & Requirements: students are supervised by a school tutor who verifies the implementation of good practices in project management methodology. Teams of students can also ask any member of the teaching team for their technical expertise. Each team has a personal project room with the equipment necessary to conduct the project.
Prerequisites: project management methodology and technical skills in IT design & development but above all responsibility, autonomy and communication.
Evaluation: Regular monitoring of intermediate deliverables by the school tutor, 4 final deliverables: a summery report – a technical report – a scientific poster – an oral defense

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F10. Large Scale Information Management (fifth year)

We have witnessed the rapid growth of large-scale data/information over the last decade in the web, IoT (Internet of Things) and elsewhere. This is known as the Big Data deluge. This concerns a wide variety of data: text, images, video, sensor data, etc. Big Data and IoT are closely related. As the number of connected objects increases, the volume of data generated by the Internet of Things explodes. Therefore, in order to be able to handle, store and analyze them, it is necessary to know and experiment with solutions for large-scale data/information storage and processing. This module presents the methods of large-scale information processing in the broadest sense, to find the most relevant information quickly for data on the Web, Internet of Things (IoT), etc. The principles of information retrieval (text and image) as well as recommendation systems are presenetd. Pratical work in LAB is proposed using Neo4J and Lucene.
Prerequisites: java programming, some experience NoSQL
Evaluation: Homeworks and 1 individual evaluaiton

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S1. Object-Oriented Design and Programming (third year)
Fundamental concepts of object-oriented programming (OOP) and design are presented: encapsulation, inheritance, interfaces, polymorphism, abstract data type, as well as good and bad practices in the field. The concepts are applied in the Java language through a set of labs tightly intermixed with courses. Specific aspects of Java that can be found in other OOP languages are also evoked, such as exceptions, libraries and input/output operations. OOP is practiced at first in standalone and online environments dedicated to Java (masking some difficulties), then on the command line (to ensure a fine understanding of the compilation and execution mechanisms), and finally in an integrated development environment (namely, Eclipse). Aiming to bring students at an operational level, the course requires students, to work individually or in teams depending on the labs, to submit milestones according to deadlines, and to collaborate through both a LIMS and a distributed revision control system (namely, git).
Prerequisites: the students are assumed to know how to code in at least one programming language such as Python, C, PHP, Javascript…(HTML being not enough). Prior to this course they must understand basic concepts such as variables, types, basic data structures, and must have knowledge of basic flow-control instructions (conditionals, loops, functions…).
No prior experience of the Java programming language nor of the UML formalism is assumed.
Evaluation: short quizzes are proposed at different moments along the course, some labs will be evaluated (sometimes with extra times to be submitted). A final written exam on paper closes the training module.

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S2. Marketing and Innovation Project (fourth year)

Design of a new product or service using specific management methods: creativity, market analysis, competitive analysis, marketing plan and digital marketing Team project, report writing and oral presentation. This module is based on a pedagogy by project. The lectures are divided into 5 sessions. Each session gives students a toolbox that they have to use as part of their project. The project is carried out in teams of 4-5 students. At the end of each session, teams must submit deliverables on the digital workspace.
Prerequisites: no marketing requirements – students have already implemented a team project management methodology during previous study semesters, they know how to use digital tools for document sharing and versioning.
Evaluation: • 4 technical sheets (concept, business intelligence, market research, mix marketing) • Oral defense

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S3. Industrial Project (fourth year)

Team project, practicals, design and development of information systems to meet the real demands of industrial partner companies or clients. Students learn to conduct an IT project in a professional context and face real difficulties.
Context & Requirements: students are supervised by a school tutor who verifies the implementation of good practices in project management methodology. Teams of students can also ask any member of the teaching team for their technical expertise. Each team has a personal project room with the equipment necessary to conduct the project.
Prerequisites: project management methodology and technical skills in IT design & development but above all responsibility, autonomy and communication.
Evaluation:
Regular monitoring of intermediate deliverables by the school tutor
4 final deliverables: a summery report – a technical report – a scientific poster – an oral defense

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S4. Web and Mobile app design and development (fourth year)

The goal of this course it to introduce students to concepts and development of both mobile and web apps. Notions presented during lessons are applied in lab sessions then integrated in a project. Web technologies discussed are Javascript, NodeJS, REST APIs, REACT, Angular ... Mobile apps are realized for the iOS system in the Swift programming language.
Prerequisites: intermediary level in algorithms, experience in a Object Oriented programming language; knowledge of basic design patterns in software engineering (MVC, Delegate, Observer...) ; basic notions of web applications, client/server architectures ; experience in the design and management of SGBD or noSQL databases. Prior experience in the Javascript programming language and in GIT will be helpful.
Evaluation: team project including a web app interacting with a mobile app, both to be designed and developped during the term.

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Biological and Food Engineering (GBA department)

 

Courses (fall semester)

Teacher(s)

ECTS

 F1. Biochemistry of proteins and chromatography (lecture+tutorial)

S. Marchesseau

2

F2. Food Technology
(practical)

L. Palmade,
D. Chevalier,
C. Cunault,
A. Fontana

5

F3. Biological Hazards (lecture)           

S. Galindo

1

F4. Project: Biological and Food engineering

 

20

F5. Project management    
(to be confirmed)

F. Viard

2

+French as a Foreign Language

 

3

TOTAL

 

33

Courses (spring semester)

Teacher(s)

ECTS

S1. Physico-chemical analysis
(practical)
           

S. Marchesseau,
V. Mora

3

S2. Nutrition and Health
(lecture+tutorial)

D. Gitenay

3

S3. Human Nutrition (practical)

D. Gitenay

2

S4. Project : nutrition

D. Gitenay,
A. Colas de la Noue

2

S5. Project: Biological and Food engineering

 

20

+French as a Foreign Language

 

3

TOTAL

 

33

F1. Protein biochemistry
Course Overview: this course (6h course, 4.5 h tutorial) is dedicated to the study of amino acids, peptides and proteins, their classification and function, and the determination of their main characteristics: molecular weight (chemical, physicochemical or physical), hydrophobicity / hydrophilicity, charge and interactive potential depending on their physico-chemical environment. Topics in this course include the determination of the primary structure of different peptide, information on the protein conformation (secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure), the production and use of amino acids and peptides, as well as the impact of physicochemical conditions on protein conformation. The extraction, purification and denaturation of proteins are studied as well as the structure / function relationships in order to optimize their use in food and biological fields. At the beginning of each course, students in small groups present in few minutes peptide or protein discovered recently and which have been the subject of publications regards to its original functional properties.

Keywords: amino-acid, peptide, protein, three-dimentional conformation, molecular weight, hydrophobicity, polarity, charge determination, structure-function relationship, protein extraction, purification, denaturation.

F1. Chromatography
Course Overview: the objective of this course (4.5h course, 3h tutorial) is to familiarize the student with chromatography techniques, its basic theory and how to interpret and quantify the results of the analysis. Topics include: general concepts on liquid chromatographic techniques (retention mechanism, role of the mobile phase, properties of the stationary phases, band spreading, resolution), presentation of the different type of chromatography and separation procedure (eg. reversed-phase and hydrophobic interactions, ion exchange, size exclusion and group specific and biospecific affinity), modes of operation (e.g. gradient, preparative elution, displacement…), chromatographic equipment including pump, column, detector (UV-Vis, Refractive Index, Fluorescence, Mass spec…) and chromatographic applications in food and biological sciences. Video demonstrations will be employed throughout the course to illustrate important concepts as well as exercises to study different applications, all in food and biological sciences.
At the end of this course, the engineering student will be able (i) to make judicious choice of analytical techniques in function of the elements studied and (ii) to quantify by different approaches the presence of specific components in biological and food solutions. He will know the physico-chemical techniques commonly used in research and development and analysis in the food industry.

Keywords: chromatography, separation, retention mechanism, column and separation procedure, quantification

F2. Food Technology
Those practical classes (51 h) take place in a food processing pilot plant and are based on five themes: canning, production line, pasteurization, concentration and drying. Over these classes, students work on semi industrial pilots and practice their knowledge in Engineering sciences and Food processing in situations close to those of industrial production. Each topic consist of a learning phase (start and conduct of pilots), followed by a phase of autonomy (choice of parameters, number of trials, optimization). Organizational aspects, metrology and internal communication are the strengths of this practical training as well as scientific and technical aspects. Industrial fluid consumption (steam, water, compressed air / vacuum, electricity) are integrated into the process and followed with a sustainable development approach.

F3. Biological hazards

  • Introduction to hazard/risk identification
  • Assessment and management of biological risks
  • Biological hazards in food safety (bacteria, viruses, parasites and biotoxins with focus on zoonotic bacteria and mycotoxins)
  • Epidemiology of food infections in France
  • Food safety agencies (ANSES, EFSA)

F4. Project: Biological and Food engineering
Individual project, either research-oriented or in partnership with a company. Each project includes a bibliographic part, some experimental measurements, some data processing and analysis, and give to rise to a report and an oral defense.

F5. Project management (to be confirmed)

S1. Physico-chemical analysis
Course overview: These practical courses (34.5h) focus on the choice of techniques for food analysis, based on concentrations determination of some elements or molecules present at significant or traces concentrations).
Students will learn how to:
(i) Exploit different analysis techniques such as spectroscopy, chromatography (CPG and HPLC), electrochemical and chemical analysis to determine the concentration of various molecules such as minerals (copper, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, iron, ...) in chemical solution, mineral water or wine, but also caffeine or sugar in some drinks, aromatic molecules in some essential oils etc ...
(ii) Study the repeatability and reproducibility of assays performed.
The emphasis of these practical experiments is on the importance of presenting a coherent result (calculation of standard deviation).
 Key words : Assays (acid-base, redox, complexation, precipitation); Electrochemical assays; Spectrophotometry; Chromatography (liquid, gas); ion exchange resins

S2. Nutrition and Health
The serie of lectures will aim at deciphering the impact of nutrition on health. Various subjects will be studied such as food allergy, food contaminants and health risks (such as endocrine disruption or cancer for example), or on another hand how fruits and vegetables micronutrients can improve aging, prevent disease and improve physical activity. During those tutorials, the student will learn, through small projects, European regulations for nutrition and health claims as well as food labelling regulations.

S3. Human Nutrition
The students will study through 4 different practical classes of 4hours each the basis of human nutrition and physiology.
First the student will put into practice the knowledge they acquired of the digestive system on an « in vitro » model of digestion. They will « digeste » too different rice varieties and assess sugar levels at the end of the digestion.
During another practical class, they will learn how to mesure the body energy needs and how to make food intakes fit those needs. They will also study blood sugar and how whole foods are better for maintaining a good blood sugar level.
During two other practical classes they will study metabolic impact of high fat diet in a rat model. They will measure metabolic markers thanks to various experiments.

S4. Project: nutrition
The goal of this project is to create a « Healthy » drink. The student will choose among many plants extracts, study the bibliography and create the beverage. Then they will analyze the extract they chose to study  on a cellular model of oxidative stress and the biochemical  properties of the beverage they created. Finally they will create a label and start to build a simplified health claim application file according to the EFSA guidelines.

S5. Project: food science and engineering
Individual project, either research-oriented or in partnership with a company. Each project includes a bibliographic part, some experimental measurements, some data processing and analysis, and give to rise to a report and an oral defense.

 

 

Materials Science (MAT department)

 

 

Courses (spring semester only)

Teacher(s)

ECTS

S2. Advanced Materials for Energy (lectures+tutorials)

R. Le Parc

2.5

S3. Project : Properties of Materials

 

3

S4. Project : Materials science

 

15

+French as a Foreign Language

 

3

TOTAL

 

23,5

 

S.2 Materials and energy

Lecture and tutorials : Introduction of the energy conversions, the issues related to the choice of the conversion system at different scales (from the plant to personal objects).

I-Thermal flux, conduction/diffusion, convection and radiation : application to insulating materials, innovations in the field

II-Materials in nuclear plants. Reminds on the fission process, fission products and radioactivity. Materials coice and potential damages.

III-photovoltaic: principle and requirement. Silicon in PV industry: elaboration and transformation and efficiency. New efficient thin films materials and organic PV.

IV-Fuel cells: electrochemical energy transformation, ionic diffusion in solids, materials in SOFC. Fuel cell efficiency

Practicals :

A- Measuring thermal conductivity with Hotdisk apparatus, choosing the experimental conditions, errors and uncertainties.

B- Ionic conduction in Ag-chalcogenide glasses : Complex impedance measurement, comparing the resistivity of two glasses at room temperature, electrical model, extraction of the activation energy from data measured at different temperatures.

C- Resonant piezoelectric ceramics : Complex impedance measurement for two PZT with different diameters, evidencing the resonance frequencies and modelling the electrical circuit.

S4. Project: materials science
Individual project, either research-oriented or in partnership with a company. Each project includes a bibliographic part, some experimental measurements, some data processing and analysis, and give to rise to a report and an oral defense.

 

Mechanical Engineering and Interactive design (MI department)

 

Courses (fall semester only)

Teacher(s)

ECTS

F1. Control in Robotics

P. Fraisse

2

F2. Modelization (starting 2017)

M. Gouttefarde

2

F3. Case study (starting 2017)

F. Cherblanc

2

F4. Advanced numerical simulations (starting 2017)

F. Jourdan

2

F5. Medical robotics
(starting 2017)

S. Krut,
S. Abdelaziz

2

F6. Project: Mechanical Engineering

 

10

F7. Project management    
(to be confirmed)

F. Viard

2

+French as a Foreign Language

 

3

TOTAL

 

25

 

F1.  Control in Robotics
Control in robotics aims at introducing the basis of kinematic and dynamic control of poly-articulated robots. We define the kinematic redundancy of a serial chain (manipulator arm) as well as multilink branched chain (humanoid robot). The notion of joint and task spaces is developed with the goal of controlling the robot in those spaces. We investigate the optimal solution of such control problem based on l2-norm subject to equalities and inequalities constraints. The control problem is then expressed by using Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse and its null-space projection operator to extend the kinematic control of redundant robots to a multi-objective control. We synthetize this notion in a hierarchical control. We then study the hierarchy of task in simulation (Matlab) applied to the manipulation (avoiding joint limit) and the humanoid robotics (sit-to-stand motion). A second part of the course is dedicated to the dynamic control based on the computed torque technique in the joint and operational spaces including the redundant case in the operational space. Finally, we conclude the course by introducing kinematic modeling and motion planning of mobile robots subject to nonholonomic constraints (unicycle, vehicle, omnidirectional). We investigate the mobile manipulation issue and propose a controller able to manage nonholonomic constraints and redundancy.   

F6. Project: mechanical engineering
Individual project, either research-oriented or in partnership with a company. Each project includes a bibliographic part, some experimental measurements, some data processing and analysis, and give to rise to a report and an oral defense.

 

 

Water Science (STE department)

 

Courses (fall semester)

Teacher(s)

ECTS

F1. Aquatic ecosystems survey and management (lectures + tutorials)

C. Aliaume

3

F2. Project: water science and engineering

 

10

+ French as a Foreign Language

 

3

TOTAL

 

16

Courses (spring semester)

Teacher(s)

ECTS

S1. Hydraulic modelling of transients and 2D free surface flow (lectures + tutorials)

V. Guinot, C. Delenne

3

S2. Project: water science and engineering

 

10

S3. Project management
(to be confirmed)

F. Viard

2

+French as a Foreign Language

 

3

TOTAL

 

18

F1. Aquatic ecosystems survey and management
This course provides concepts and methodologies for i) biological data acquisition (sampling methods, fishing techniques, etc.), ii) population and community study (abundance assessments, mark-recapture methods, modelling, multivariate analyses, etc.), and iii) habitat and biological resource managements (preservation, restoration, global environmental indicators, etc.). It is composed of 15h of lectures and 21h of tutorial. The final grade is composed of a literature search project (25%), a practical work project (25%) and a final exam (50%).

F2. Project: water science and engineering
Individual project, either research-oriented or in partnership with a company. Each project includes a bibliographic part, some experimental measurements, some data processing and analysis, and gives rise to a report and an oral defense.

S1. Project: hydraulic modelling of transients and 2D free surface flow
1. Pressurized pipe transients. The governing equations and the behaviour of the solutions of the pipe transients equations is analysed. The functioning of mitigation techniques (air vessels, etc.) is analysed and applied to practical test cases.

2. One-dimensional open channel modelling software. This part of the subject focuses on the analysis of the numerical techniques used by commercial/engineering software packages for open channel flow used in engineering and consultancy companies. The solution methods and limitations of the packages are examined. Projects are carried out using market-available software packages.

3. Two-dimensional free surface flow modelling has become a standard to the hydraulic engineering community. In this subject the students are trained to the theory and practice of two-dimensional free surface flow modelling. State-of-the-art modelling software packages using unstructured grids are used. Simulations are first carried out for academic test cases. The influence of geometry, mesh design, hydraulic parameters and boundary conditions is critically assessed. In a second phase real-world configurations are simulated. Applications include floodplain, flash flood and urban flood modelling. Teamwork is encouraged through projects.

Keywords: pipe transients, open channel modelling, two-dimensional flood modelling, modelling software, floodplain modelling, flash flood modelling, urban floods

S2. Project: water science and engineering
Individual project, either research-oriented or in partnership with a company. Each project includes a bibliographic part, some experimental measurements, some data processing and analysis, and gives rise to a report and an oral defense.